Takeshi Miyazawa

Mech Cadet Yu 1 (August 2017)

Mech Cadet Yu #1So giant robots come from outer space and befriend kids, who then pilot them in battle against… whatever. Maybe kaiju. Only this time a robot–a Mech–picks a teen janitor instead of an specially trained teen, because of course the U.S. military has gotten involved and corrupted the whole process. They’ve even built their own Mech; I wonder if the evil cadet who bullies teen janitor Yu will be a problem? Excellent art from Takeshi Miyazawa but utterly hohum script from Greg Pak. Mech Cadet Yu is off a rocky start.

CREDITS

Writer, Greg Pak; penciller, Takeshi Miyazawa; colorist, Triona Farrell; letterer, Simon Bowland; editors, Cameron Chittock and Eric Harburn; publisher, Boom! Studios.

Ms. Marvel 15 (July 2015)

Ms. Marvel #15Okay, what is Wilson doing?

She knows where the story beats are for this issue but she doesn’t hit them. Kamala gets her first broken heart. Wilson gives it the last page and less emphasis than a string of Star Trek and Star Wars references. After a big gamer reference.

Did Marvel’s market research come back on Ms. Marvel or something? Because it’s darned frustrating considering the rest of the issue is pretty good stuff. There’s an amusing “real world” products in the comic book context with Bruno using Siri and Kamala’s phone being better than anything James Bond had in the sixties and maybe seventies. Wilson’s got the chops to do something amazing and, every time something significant comes up, she goes for the cheap shot.

And the overall plotting is getting stretched.

Ms. Marvel’s still an exceptionally likable comic, Wilson’s just making it more likable than exceptional lately.

CREDITS

Crushed, Part Three; writer, G. Willow Wilson; artist, Takeshi Miyazawa; colorist, Ian Herring; letterer, Joe Caramagna; editors, Charles Beacham and Sana Amanat; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Ms. Marvel 14 (June 2015)

Ms. Marvel #14When I started reading this issue of Ms. Marvel, all I could think was, “I hope Wilson doesn’t make Kamala’s ‘too good to be true’ love interest too good to be true.” Because lumping Kamala in with all the other teen superheroes who’ve fallen for someone they shouldn’t have? I hoped, pointlessly as it turns out, Wilson wouldn’t go down that path.

But I never expected her to do it in one issue. Especially not an issue where she finally turned the brother into a full character (he and Bruno have “the talk”). It sends a really odd message about Kamala actually not being able to think for herself, which I’m sure isn’t Wilson’s goal but it’s definitely what happens.

Miyazawa’s artwork is lovely this issue. Not perfect, but lovely. It’s idyllic, New York trash on the streets romance. It’s a shame Wilson went with the norm and chucked it.

CREDITS

Crushed, Part Two; writer, G. Willow Wilson; artist, Takeshi Miyazawa; colorist, Ian Herring; letterer, Joe Caramagna; editors, Charles Beacham and Sana Amanat; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Ms. Marvel 13 (May 2015)

Ms. Marvel #13Takeshi Miyazawa’s art changes Ms. Marvel. Along with the family emphasis this issue–Kamala spending time with them instead of her friends at school–it nearly feels like a different comic. Miyazawa is action-oriented and less detailed than the comic’s usual artists; the experience is different.

Even Wilson’s writing feels a little different, as she’s telling a story about Kamala having a crush on an older guy from her perspective (complete with her family being concerned).

Not to mention there are now so many Inhumans everywhere it’s like Marvel got worried about “The Flash” TV show being able to create a new supervillain every week and had to do the same thing themselves.

Unfortunately, that aspect of the comic–the big, somewhat boring supervillain fight–is where Wilson loses track of her story. The texture is gone. It’s a fine issue, it just ends a little out of step.

CREDITS

Crushed, Part One; writer, G. Willow Wilson; artist, Takeshi Miyazawa; colorists, Ian Herring and Irma Knivila; letterer, Joe Caramagna; editors, Charles Beacham, Devin Lewis and Sana Amanat; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Avengers vs. Atlas 1 (March 2010)

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Why isn’t Jeff Parker writing the Avengers? I’d read an Avengers book by Parker in a heartbeat, even with the strange team line-up they’ve got going. His characterizations here–especially of Wolverine, Spider-Man and Luke Cage (the Captain America is a little nondescript)–are fantastic. It fully accounts for the absurdity of the line-up, but doesn’t let it show stop.

As for the Atlas scenes–it’s mostly Atlas, mostly Atlas in fight scenes–Parker does his standard great job. He’s changed things up a bit, since Atlas stories usually have some underlying arc, but here it’s just the regular one–they’re on a mission of break up the evil Atlas remnants.

The issue’s mostly action, but Parker and Hardman get in four or five set pieces, so it doesn’t just fly by during the fighting. It also doesn’t hurt Parker comes up with some great visual concepts.

CREDITS

Earth’s Mightiest Super Heroes; artist, Gabriel Hardman; colorist, Elizabeth Breitweiser; letterer, Tom Orzechowski. Defender of the Deep; artist, Takeshi Miyazawa; colorist, Chris Sotomayor; letterer, Joe Sabino. Writer, Jeff Parker; editors, Nathan Cosby and Mark Paniccia; publisher, Marvel Comics.

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