Ryan Stegman

The Superior Spider-Man 10 (July 2013)

912908Very interesting issue. With Otto freed of Ghost Peter, he makes some different choices–first is prioritizing responses to crimes and crises (which Slott addressed earlier in the series but not as directly) and, second, how he’s going to spend his Parker time.

Without the old Peter Parker memories, Otto’s scenes with Aunt May completely different. He’s not trying to fit in as much as enjoy the company of his new family. The same goes for his pursuing the tutor, Anna. Slott writes them a couple good scenes together this issue.

There are a couple action scenes, of course, one at the open and a disaster one at the close. There’s also the introduction of two new villains; the first comes in dialogue, the second gets the final page reveal.

One of them appears smarter than Otto, which should give him a fine adversary, as Otto’s intellect makes him invincible.

CREDITS

Independence Day; writer, Dan Slott; penciller, Ryan Stegman; inkers, Stegman and Cam Smith; colorist, Edgar Delgado; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editor, Ellie Pyle and Stephen Wacker; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Superior Spider-Man 9 (July 2013)

909330Whew. There I was, having to take back some negative comments about Slott’s pacing last issue and how well he sold the story overall… and now I’m validated.

This issue reads in something like two minutes, maybe three if you take a bathroom break.

Otto zooms down into his own mind to fight the collected memories of Peter Parker–Ghost Peter isn’t a ghost as much as congealed memories–and there’s a big street fight out of Superman II.

Lots of guest stars. Pretty much every supporting cast member, friend and foe. Ryan Stegman must have had a great time drawing it, but there’s no story. It’s a scene out of a bad Matrix knock-off. Slott gets in one moment at the end where Ghost Peter is revealed as selfish (just like Otto) but he doesn’t do anything with the duality.

The issue’s pointless. Slott wastes the reader’s time.

CREDITS

Troubled Mind, Part Three: Gray Matters; writer, Dan Slott; artist, Ryan Stegman; colorist, Edgar Delgado; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editor, Ellie Pyle and Stephen Wacker; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Superior Spider-Man 3 (April 2013)

896148Slott’s starting to edge in on Batman territory here. The Vulture is using children to commit crimes, strapping them into flight harnesses and sending them out. Otto loses it and almost kills him, horrifying Ghost Peter and the police lady.

I can’t remember her name. It might be Carlie or something; it’s goofy, whatever it is.

There’s the judgment from Ghost Peter and cop lady, but… Otto’s kind of right, isn’t he? If the Vulture has graduated to abusing little kids, the soft-hand tactics are clearly outdated.

There’s also some stuff with Ghost Peter getting into Otto’s memories and discovering Otto’s human side. Those scenes aren’t particularly good, since Otto’s not in them. Not bad though.

The more I think about it, yeah… Slott is just turning Spider-Man into Batman. He’s also showing how Otto’s intelligence was wasted as a criminal. He’s more effective as a good guy.

CREDITS

Everything You Know Is Wrong; writer, Dan Slott; artist, Ryan Stegman; colorist, Edgar Delgado; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Ellie Pyle and Stephen Wacker; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Superior Spider-Man 2 (March 2013)

893413I’m liking Stegman less this issue. Something about him reminds me of Todd McFarlane; he’s busy without content, just a lot blockier than ol’ Toddy.

Luckily, I’m liking Slott’s writing a lot more this issue. Ghost Peter has a big role here, basically narrating Otto’s narration. Only Ghost Peter can only know what Otto’s narrating, not what he’s thinking, which means Otto can surprise both the reader and Ghost Peter. It leads to a couple nice moments throughout the issue and a great one at the end. Slott’s freaking brilliant with how he uses Otto–Otto’s a long-time Spider-Man reader inside the comic. It’s an awesome device.

And since Ghost Peter’s actually whiney and annoying (he’s the Star Wars Luke Skywalker), having Otto impress him (and the reader) is doubly satisfying. Superior doesn’t work if the reader wants Otto to fail.

Slott makes a moronic idea utterly fantastic.

CREDITS

The Peter Principle; writer, Dan Slott; artist, Ryan Stegman; colorist, Edgar Delgado; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Ellie Pyle and Stephen Wacker; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Superior Spider-Man 1 (March 2013)

889935Once one gets past the entirely goofy brain-swapping detail, Superior Spider-Man is a hoot.

Dan Slott’s success at it comes from his refusal to play too much into Doctor Octopus all of a sudden being a good guy. Otto isn’t out to beat the new Sinister Six because it’s the right thing to do, he’s doing it because they’re using his old bad guy club’s name. He doesn’t run away from a fight because he’s scared or hurt, but because he doesn’t actually care.

He does care about one detail in Peter’s life… Mary Jane. Physically at least.

It’s a ludicrous idea for a comic and Slott pulls it off with apparent ease. He keeps it all very dramatic, even though Otto’s clearly got to do the right thing.

Ryan Stegman effectively handles the art. He could be better; doesn’t matter.

Otto makes a darn fun Spider-Man.

CREDITS

Hero or Menace?; writer, Dan Slott; artist, Ryan Stegman; colorist, Edgar Delgado; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Ellie Pyle and Stephen Wacker; publisher, Marvel Comics.

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