Rob G.

Detective Comics 788 (January 2004)

148816This issue doesn’t just have bad writing. Bad writing the art and pacing could probably surmount. Mike Lilly’s pencils aren’t the greatest, but Sean Parsons and Dan Davis give them a nice inking and it all moves pretty well visually.

But Paul Bolles’s script? It’s exceptionally incompetent. He writes all this third person narration, very hard-boiled (at least as he’s concerned) and it makes Batman laughable. Maybe because Bolles buys into the faceless avenging night demon thing, or at least excepts the reader to buy into it.

And for what? Some Blockbuster on the rampage story not even starring Blockbuster.

I had never heard of Bolles before reading this comic; I’m hoping I never do again.

Sadly, not even Rick Spears and Rob G.’s backup can cleanse the palate. It’s predictable–though Spears writes a good Joker–and disappointing. But far better than the incompetent feature, of course.

CREDITS

The Randori Stone, Part One; writer, Paul Bolles; penciller, Mike Lilly; inkers, Sean Parsons and Dan Davis; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Clem Robins; editors, Michael Wright and Bob Schreck. The Dogcatcher, Part Four; writer, Rick Spears; artist, Rob G.; colorist, Guy Major; letterer, Janice Chiang; editors, Nachie Castro and Matt Idelson. Publisher, DC Comics.

Detective Comics 787 (December 2003)

148815Rick Burchett does about half well on this issue. Maybe more than half, but when he goes too cartoonish, it hurts the better stuff. And by cartoonish, I don’t mean his overall approach. His approach is fine–his Mad Hatter, for instance, is gloriously cartoonish and wonderful. I more mean things like Bullock not having eyes, just dots. It’s odd.

The script, from Brian K. Vaughan, is pretty darn good. It’s a nice done in one, with Batman tracking a kidnapped Kirk Langstrom. There’s the Hatter, there’s some Arkham stuff (unfortunately the issue’s weakest scene) and a dragon.

Vaughan overwrites the narration but his story is solid. He tries too hard with the dialogue and sometimes has weak details. His end reveal is sublime.

The Joker’s dog backup, from Spears and Rob G., continues. It’s excellent. There’s a lot of detail, enough personality for the protagonist and a great cliffhanger.

CREDITS

Mimsy Were the Borogoves; writer, Brian K. Vaughan; penciller, Rick Burchett; inker, John Lowe; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, John Costanza; editors, Michael Wright and Bob Schreck. The Dogcatcher, Part Three; writer, Rick Spears; artist, Rob G.; colorist, Guy Major; letterer, Janice Chiang; editor, Matt Idelson. Publisher, DC Comics.

Detective Comics 786 (November 2003)

148814For the finale, Bruce does some detective work again. Gordon’s missing so Batman tries to retrace his steps, with Alan Scott along to see how detective work is done. Brubaker sends them on a different line of investigation than Gordon had, which makes sense in terms of creating an interesting narrative… but Gordon’s was better. Shouldn’t Batman been able to duplicate it?

Maybe Brubaker just wanted to give Zircher the opportunity to do some cool fight scenes. Batman and Green Lantern actually pair quite well visually. And Brubaker does a fine job writing Alan Scott, even if he doesn’t get any character moments.

Gordon gets a nice one, then Bruce gets a nice one, right at the end. It’s a good little story.

The second part of the Joker dog backup continues to impress. Spears has a lot of humor in it and a great protagonist. And Rob G.’s good.

CREDITS

Made of Wood, Conclusion; writer, Ed Brubaker; penciller, Patrick Zircher; inkers, Aaron Sowd and Steve Bird; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Todd Klein; editors, Michael Wright and Bob Schreck. The Dogcatcher, Part Two; writer, Rick Spears; artist, Rob G.; colorist, Guy Major; letterer, Janice Chiang; editor, Matt Idelson. Publisher, DC Comics.

Detective Comics 785 (October 2003)

148813This issue Gordon gets to do all the detecting and Batman gets to beat people up. Actually, Batman teams up with Alan Scott and they go beat people up together. They’re trying to get information and don’t get much. Gordon’s actual detective work pays off.

While, yes, Batman probably could have done the work in five minutes on the Batcomputer… the point of the issue is how Brubaker plays him off Alan Scott. Bruce admires the Golden Age Green Lantern, looking up to him as an ideal example of a hero. When the conversation turns to methods, it gets a little more complex, but Brubaker’s observations about Bruce are fantastic.

Great art from Zircher and Sowd too.

The backup, from Rick Spears and Rob G., is a nice day in the life of a Gotham City dog catcher. It’s a nice mix of urban reality and Batman strangeness. Good art.

CREDITS

Made of Wood, Part Two; writer, Ed Brubaker; penciller, Patrick Zircher; inker, Aaron Sowd; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Todd Klein; editors, Michael Wright and Bob Schreck. The Dogcatcher, Part One; writer, Rick Spears; artist, Rob G.; colorist, Guy Major; letterer, Janice Chiang; editor, Matt Idelson. Publisher, DC Comics.

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