Hunters (2020) s01e10 – Eilu v’ Eilu

So when I thought “Hunters” was going to use the tenth episode to set up next season… turns out I was mistaken. There’s some setup for next season, complete with some betrayals and cast changes and very big surprise surprises, but it’s mostly a resolution to this season. To things the show never established needing resolved.

It opens with a flashback to the year before, when Jeannie Berlin originally does to Al Pacino to tell them they have to hunt Nazis in their golden years and whatnot. Berlin and Pacino sit for a very awkward, could be good if Michael Uppendahl’s direction of the actors weren’t so terrible and David Weil’s writing weren’t so blah. It’s a wasted opportunity, but will just be the first of many in the episode.

The next one comes in the present, when Logan Lerman—back to being a good boy after last episode—goes to visit Pacino and Pacino’s disappointed in him because Lerman’s not bloodthirsty enough. So Lerman bitches to his last friend left—Henry Hunter Hall—because the girl is gone this episode. What a red herring she turned out to be on like four different levels. Anyway, Lerman bitches about how Pacino doesn’t like him anymore because Lerman’s not a killer. Hunter Hall—completely straight-faced—is like, “well, you know Jean Grey and Spider-Man both went on to kill the big bad” or something to that effect.

One really has to wonder what superhero movie Weil desperately wants to write because it’s desperately obvious he’s elevator pitching.

What else—meaning what else won’t be a spoiler to the multiple big twists—oh, Greg Austin. Greg Austin, even though he’s just playing a psychopathic neo-Nazi at this point, is back to doing well. Show really didn’t end up treating him well, which is fine; “Hunters” doesn’t treat anyone well in the end.

Except, of course, Dylan Baker. He’s a lot of fun.

And William Sadler’s got a good glorified cameo.

Lerman continues to disappoint. He gets to do his whole “seeing the signs” thing with information again this episode, but he gets all that information from Nazi-hunting notes his grandma has been hiding around the house for a calendar year and Lerman never noticed. Weil’s writing has so many “duh” moments.

As for where the show leaves it for the season… it’s pretty cheap, it’s kind of lazy, but I imagine I’ll be back for the next one. At least to see what’s up with some of the cast, though it’s lost a few major draws.