Eno and Plum

Dark Horse Presents 100 0 (July 1995)

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This teaser for Dark Horse Presents 100 has some great stuff in it… but it also has some unbearably long entries.

Chadwick’s Concrete—though it’s always fun to read Concrete assuming the worst about humanity—goes on forever and turns out to be a prologue. It’s a little lame, though Chadwick’s art is decent.

LaBan’s Emo and Plum is relatively painless. It’s short, anyway. However Musgrove’s Fat Dog Mendoza is awful.

Paul Pope’s got a couple pages and it’s lovely (kind of an interactive discussion of Picasso). Some great figure work.

Brubaker and McEown tease their entry in 100, as does French. The Brubaker and McEown one seems a lot more compelling, with Brubaker’s writing strong even in the one page.

Then Mignola has an endless three page preview for his Hellboy story. It’s got a lot of expositional dialogue.

Still, this teaser’s better than many of the regular issues.

CREDITS

Eno and Plum; story, art and lettering by Terry LaBan. Concrete, The Artistic Impulse (excerpt); story, art and lettering by Paul Chadwick. Fat Dog Mendoza, The Secret Life of Leftovers (excerpt); story, art and lettering by Scott Musgrove. Pistacho!!; story, art and lettering by Paul Pope. Bird Dog (excerpt); story by Ed Brubaker; art by Pat McEwon. The Ninth Gland (excerpt); story, art and lettering by Renée French. Hellboy, The Chained Coffin (excerpt); story and art by Mike Mignola. Edited by Scott Allie and Bob Schreck.

Dark Horse Presents 95 (March 1995)

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LaBan finishes Eno and Plum better than he started but not as good as the second installment. I think this one is the first I laughed out loud reading, but the story’s predictable and LaBan still doesn’t do anything to turn Plum into a character. Worse, he gives her these moronic thoughts. I’d say it’s him giving her character, but they’re so bland, it’s clear he’s just trying to fill blank space.

Campbell’s Picture of Doreen Grey continues–this time concentrating on a big battle scene and Joe Theseus and Ginny (an Amazon goddess, I think, much better character than Wonder Woman too) trying to be spontaneously romantic when he can read the future and they’re both immortal. Campbell again concentrates on the humor to good success.

I’m really hoping this issue is the last Too Much Coffee Man. Wheeler apparently thinks regurgitating “Seinfeld” as a comic makes him creative.

CREDITS

The Eyeball Kid, The Picture of Doreen Gray, Part Two; story, art and lettering by Eddie Campbell. Too Much Coffee Man, Too Much Coffee Man Meets His Coffee Maker, Part Four; story and art by Shannon Wheeler. Eno and Plum, Part Three; story and art by Terry LaBan. Edited by Bob Schreck and Scott Allie.

Dark Horse Presents 94 (February 1995)

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Okay, so the issue opens with Eddie Campbell doing an action story. It’s not all action, but there’s a bunch of action. It’s crazy—there’s a big fight scene. Campbell keeps all the humor and a lot of the thoughtfulness (he tones down the thoughtfulness a little) and adds a regular fight scene. It’s crazy and great.

Too Much Coffee Man also has a fight scene this issue, between the hero and an invader from Mars. Someone must have told Wheeler he’s funny and that someone was wrong. The installment even opens with Wheeler talking about his story being boring and pointless. Some nice art at least (except the fight scene, which is awful).

Surprisingly, as LaBan turns it into a workplace comedy, Eno and Plum gets good. It’s still a little broad—Plum, the girl, isn’t much of a character, though Eno gets actually depth here. An unexpected surprise.

CREDITS

The Eyeball Kid, The Picture of Doreen Gray, Part One; story, art and lettering by Eddie Campbell. Too Much Coffee Man, Too Much Coffee Man Meets His Coffee Maker, Part Three; story and art by Shannon Wheeler. Eno and Plum, Part Two; story and art by Terry LaBan. Edited by Bob Schreck and Scott Allie.

Dark Horse Presents 93 (January 1995)

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This issue’s content implies the Presents editors didn’t care about the script, as long as the art was good. It’s a real improvement, actually, since there are some issues whether neither are any good.

I’ll start with Blackheart to get it out of the way. Morrison uses demonic possession as his deus ex machina here. Real creative. However, he does go and say FDR’s government during the New Deal supported racist paramilitary organizations. I don’t think Morrison’s doing it for effect, I think he’s just an idiot. Great Quitely art though.

LaBan’s Eno and Plum has some excellent, carefully done cartooning. Too bad the script is inane slacker with rich girl stuff. I do like the bad guy has a butt for a chin. But the script’s awful.

As for Wheeler’s Too Much Coffee Man… he tries to inject narrative. It fails. Again, some nice design, but a terrible script.

CREDITS

Eno and Plum, Part One; story and art by Terry LaBan. Blackheart, Part Three; story by Robbie Morrison; art by Frank Quitely; lettering by Clem Robbins. Too Much Coffee Man, Too Much Coffee Man Meets His Coffee Maker, Part Two; story and art by Shannon Wheeler. Edited by Bob Schreck and Edward Martin III.

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