Dry County

Dry County #2 (April 2018)

Dry County #2Dry County #2 reveals the mystery and it’s rather unexpected. At least for me. I was expecting some noir. Instead, it’s a kidnapping thriller. Only not a very thrilling one.

The protagonist, Lou, finally thinks things are going to progress with the girl he likes. She’s moved away from her abusive boyfriend, he–Lou–is making things happen at work. Everything is coming together. Then she’s kidnapped. Her roommate is assaulted. She’s just gone. There’s a note with the newspaper cut out letters. Lou starts investigating.

Couple things there aren’t. There’s not a ransom demand. There’s not a followup with the assaulted roommate. The girl’s got another roommate who just goes along with Lou’s “let’s not call the cops and instead stage a different scenario for the assaulted guy” plan. The note says no cops.

Lou’s investigation in the rest of the issue is just him canvasing the city where he thinks the girl might be. Someone keeps trying to run him over, but not seriously. Lou’s always able to get out of the way. He brings along his dumb tough guy friend for muscle, which leads to some genial amusement.

At best, Dry County is genially amusing. It’s not dangerous–it’s not realistic enough to be dangerous–and, as a protagonist, Lou is way undercooked.

Tommaso does instill some charm into the book. But probably not enough to keep it going.

CREDITS

Writer and artist, Rich Tommaso; publisher, Image Comics.

Dry County #1 (March 2018)

Dry County #1The content of Dry County #1 doesn’t really match the subtitle on the cover: “A Lou Rossi Comic – The EVERYMAN Crime Series.” Not to mention the “M” rating. Because there’s no crime in Dry County. There’s not even a whiff of it. Lead Lou Rossi lives in Little Havana, Miami, but it’s basically empty when he’s outside. Lonely guy living lonely existence.

Lou is a comic strip cartoonist at the paper. Between going to work and doing his daily, three-panel gag strip, he gets drunk. Then he meets a girl. Only she’s got problems with her boyfriend. It’s not noir, but it’s noir. Rich Tommaso’s art is extremely mellow. It’s hard to get agitated, even when Lou chases the girl’s abusive boyfriend away.

Tommaso writes it first-person, with Lou’s journal entries in between panels. The entries are on lined paper with neat handwriting; again, not very noirish. It’s too bright and vivid. Not cheerful, but precious.

As mundane slice of life–vividly rendered–Dry County #1 is all right. As the prelude to EVERYMAN crime… well, it’s slow. Especially since the characters are so thin, even the protagonist. Tommaso writes them for occasional gag humor too. It’s hard to imagine it getting bloody.

CREDITS

Writer and artist, Rich Tommaso; publisher, Image Comics.

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